Red Bank Volunteer Fire Department

The RBFD is organized into five fire fighting companies, a Fire Police Company and the First Aid and Rescue Squad. Additional support is provided to the Department by its Scuba Diving Team, the Department’s Fire Cadets, and the Ladies Auxiliary.

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Red Blank Logo

The Red Bank Fire Department (RBFD) is comprised entirely of volunteers dedicated to the protection of property and life against fire hazards. Founded in 1872, the Red Bank Fire Department has provided firefighting services, medical assistance, and rescue operations to the Borough of Red Bank community for nearly 150 years.

Executive & Supporting Units

Fire Chief And Executive Council

RBFD Chiefs


The Office of the Chief is occupied by an elected, active member from one of the six Red Bank fire companies. The term is for one year in office, normally preceded by two years as Deputy Chief; first year as Second Deputy Chief and a second year as First Deputy Chief, respectively.

The Chiefs are elected each December from nominees presented by the fire company in turn for chief selection. The rotation among companies is in the following order:  Navesink Hook and Ladder, Independent Engine, Westside Hose, Liberty Hose, Union Hose and Relief Engine companies.

In the 1800s, the RBFD Chief was predominantly a member of the Navesink Hook and Ladder Company, with sporadic designations from Relief and Independent. The first Liberty Hose designated Chief did not occur until 1905. This same year, the position began its rotation among the fire companies with a typical two year tenure for each Chief, changing to a one year term in 1931. The first designated Chief out of Union Hose was in 1907 and for Westside Hose (the youngest company) it did not happen 1929. The currently established cyclical rotation among the companies began in 1925, which starts with Hook and Ladder and ends with Relief Engine company. 
 

RBFD Executive Council


The Executive Council consists of five member delegates from each of the five fire companies and the duly elected Chiefs of the Department. The Council meets once a month to conduct business and to make executive decisions and policy affecting the RBFD.

The RBFD Executive Council is established by law as per Borough Ordinance Code. The Council is thereby tasked with the responsibility for all administrative policies of the Red Bank Volunteer Fire Department.

Fire Police Company
RBFD Fire Police

Founded in 1886 by James R. Wolcott, the Red Bank Fire Police was initially made up of three members from each fire company, but expanded to five members per company in 1969. The primary mission of the company is to secure and restrict access to fire scenes. Fire Police headquarters are located at the Union Hose Company building on Shrewsbury Avenue, and this facility currently provides housing for its members and equipment. 

The Red Bank Fire Police was organized in 1886 by James R. Wolcott. It was made up of three members from each fire company. In 1969, in order to strengthen the Fire Police organization, social members belonging to the fire department were allowed to join the fire patrol. Currently, the organization consists of five members from each fire company.

Fire Trucks History

The first fire patrol truck was purchased in 1947. It was a one and a half-ton Ford truck equipped with 2 large floodlights, a gas generator for the lights, a deck gun, and space for necessary equipment for the men. In 1965, a large and modern apparatus was purchased from GMC to replace the former Ford police truck.

Fire Police headquarters are located at the Union Hose Company building, on Shrewsbury Avenue. This facility currently provides housing for its members and the equipment required to perform its primary mission of securing and restricting access to fire scenes.

A modified 1989 Ford 350 XL Diesel is currently used by the Red Bank Fire Police to transport its personnel and equipment.


 

First Aid and Rescue Squad
RB First Aid & Rescue Squad

The First Aid & Rescue Squad facilities house two fully-equipped ambulances, a rescue truck, a two-boat trailer, and other equipment necessary for first aid and rescue operations. The Squad currently responds to over 1,200 calls per year and has served at many major local disasters including the Morro Castle ship fire, the Hindenburg explosion, the NAD Earl ship explosion, the South Amboy explosion, and the Woodbridge train wreck. 

Squad facilities also include an emergency generator and can serve as an emergency hospital or shelter. As a unit of the Red Bank Fire Department, the Squad participates in Department drills and answers all fire calls. It also trains with regular disaster drills in conjunction with local hospitals and the First Aid Association. 

The Squad is a member of the New Jersey State First Aid Council and holds charter membership in the Monmouth County Association of the First Aid Squads and the International Rescue and First Aid Association.

The Red Bank First Aid and Rescue Squad was organized on March 21, 1930, at a meeting held in Union Hose County Number 1. Thirteen men got together and donated $10 each to purchase a used Meteor ambulance from Worden Funeral Home for $100. These thirteen men were Raymond Brower, Walter Noble, Austin Boice, Lawrence Forgus, Henry Aldsworth, Gus Colmorgen, Edmund Crelin, Alfred Kubli, David MacIntosh, George Predmore, Frank Reuther, John Seville, and Garett Van Ness.

Other dedicated Red Bank residents joined in to provide volunteer services to the Town. One such man who served along with the original thirteen was the late Adrian "DeDe" Woodward, providing 55 years of service to the squad.

This first rig served from June 1930 through April 1932 when it could not be repaired anymore. Dr. Ernest Fahnestock, of Shrewsbury, had donated a used ambulance to the Borough of Red Bank, which was then used to replace the original Meteor rig. In 1937, the first new ambulance, a Henney Oldsmobile, was purchased.

In 1948, the number of calls rose to over 200 per year compared to 89 calls for the first year. Two ambulances were now needed to attend to all these calls and a new Cadillac was purchased and used as the first response unit. The 1937 Oldsmobile was overhauled and used as the reserve rig. Both these rigs were replaced in 1952 and 1954 by Packards and an aluminum boat was purchased for water rescue work. By this time the number of calls had risen to over 800 per year.

Squad House

The squad was housed in the Relief Engine Company's firehouse, on Drummond Place. As the Squad's activities increased, these quarters became too small for effective operations. In 1959, construction of new quarters was completed, at the present home of the Squad, on Spring Street.

The facilities house two fully equipped ambulances, a rescue truck, a two boat trailer, and other associated equipment necessary for first aid and rescue operations. The Squad now responds to over 1,200 calls per year. The building is also equipped with an emergency generator and it may serve as an emergency hospital or shelter.

The Squad has served at many major disasters in the area, Namely; the Morro Castle ship fire, the Hindenburg explosion, the NAD Earl ship explosion, the South Amboy explosion, and the Woodbridge train wreck.

The Squad, as a unit of the Red Bank Fire Department, participates in Department drills and answers all fire calls. It also participates in regular disaster drills in conjunction with local hospitals and the First Aid Association. The Squad is a member of the New Jersey State First Aid Council and holds charter membership in the Monmouth County Association of the First Aid Squads and the International Rescue and First Aid Association.

 

Scuba Rescue Team
RBFD Dive Team

The Scuba Rescue Team consists of highly trained divers who operate specialized equipment utilized for water rescue operations. Called for water rescues, the Scuba Rescue Team provides services and aid for the Navesink River, Red Bank’s Mohawk Pond, and the nearby New Jersey shore area towns.

The team and equipment are housed at the First Aid building on Spring Street. 

The Marine Division with its Scuba Diving Team is an integral part of Red Bank Fire Department rescue operations. Because of its specialized mission, it operates in a semi-autonomous capacity, under the direction of the Fire Chief and the Captain of the division. The origins of this team can be technically placed back to 1952 or 1954 when the RBFD Rescue Squad purchased its first aluminum boat for water rescue operations.

Current Team

Today, the Team consists of highly trained divers and operates specialized equipment utilized for water rescue operations. Red Bank scuba divers are called into service each time a rescue is needed in the Navesink River or at Red Bank's Mohawk Pond, as well as for water rescues in the nearby New Jersey shore area towns.

Equipment

The team and its equipment are housed at the First Aid building, located on Spring Street.

 

Junior Firefighter Program
Junior Firefighter Training Drill

The Executive Fire Council in coordination with the Explorer program of the Boy Scouts of America oversees the Junior Firefighter program, which is designed to teach the skills of firefighting to young teenagers ages 14 to 17.

Experienced firefighters of the department serve as sponsors for the junior firefighters and are responsible for their training and education through formal classroom training and practical hands-on exercises. The program is designed to teach safety and provide confidence in the use of firematic equipment and techniques. 

Junior firefighters are restricted from entering any structure involved in fire or smoke and are also restricted from engaging in life-threatening activities. However, junior firefighters do fully participate in many other duties required on the fire ground, like stretching hose lines, assisting with hydrant operations, supplying firefighters with the necessary equipment, and other essential functions. 

Once a junior firefighter reaches 18 years of age, he or she may join one of the firefighting units of the Fire Department. 

Advanced Stages of Training

Once a junior firefighter achieves advanced stages of training, he or she is allowed to respond to fire calls with the Department's firefighting units. While the junior firefighters are restricted from entering any structure involved in fire or smoke and are also restricted from engaging in life-threatening activities, they do fully participate in many other duties required on the fire ground. For example, junior firefighters may assist with stretching hose lines, supply the necessary equipment to firefighters, assist with hydrant operations, and with many other essential functions; all of which are performed from outside the structure. For their safety, all fire ground activities are supervised by the sponsors and the Fire Chief.

Joining the Program

Residents of the Borough of Red Bank or residents of Monmouth County residing within 5 miles from the Borough of Red Bank, between the ages of 14 and 17 may join the Junior Firefighter Program. For more information or to join, contact us through our website’s contact form.

 

Ladies Auxiliary
RBFD Ladies Aux

The Ladies Auxiliary is made up of women who assist members of the Fire Department in whatever capacity they were needed. Historically members have participated in many parades, fairs, regattas and wet downs, Halloween parades. The Ladies Auxiliary also served coffee, water and food at most of the major fires.

In the year 1950, representatives from the following Ladies Auxiliaries; Westside, Liberty, Independent, Hook and Ladder, and Relief met to form the Executive Council of the Red Bank Fire Department Ladies Auxiliary. The organization's purpose was to be ready to assist the men of the Fire Department in whatever way they were needed and to guide and coordinate the activities of the Ladies Auxiliaries. Mrs. Jacob Bloom, of Liberty Hose Company, served as the first president of the Council, in 1950.

On May 26, 1954, the Union Hose Auxiliary was organized and sent representatives to the council, which made a total of six companies in the Council. For the past twenty-two years, the Council has met with representatives from three members of each Auxiliary. They have participated in many parades, worked in fairs, regattas and wet downs, served refreshments at the Halloween parades, and coffee and food at most of the major fires.

In the late ’20s, an organization called the "Big" Auxiliary with members of the then-existing auxiliaries was organized. It was not conducted as the Executive Council is today. Its main purpose was for participating in parades. The uniform worn at that time was a white dress with a yellow and white cape and a matching cap. The "Big" Auxiliary was eventually disbanded. Following is a brief history of each fire company's Ladies Auxiliary organization.

Westside: Between 1915 and 1920, a group of wives, of charter members of the Westside Hose Company met to form an Auxiliary. The early records are not available, but Mrs. James Hunter, who joined in 1918, and Mrs. Harold Hendrickson in 1922, have given names of some of the first members: Mrs. Charles Dupler, Mrs. Gustave Ornberg, Mrs. John Oaks, Sr. and Mrs. Charles Scott (then Mary Oaks). Mrs. Dupler may have been the first President.

Hook and Ladder: This Auxiliary was started by a group of wives of members of that company, in June 1947. Mrs. Muriel Minery (William) held the first meeting at her home. Mrs. Louise Brasch was elected as the first President. In 1997, was the 50th Anniversary of this organization.

Relief: Relief Auxiliary was started on September 20, 1949. Mrs. Frank Wisseman was elected as the first President, serving with her that year were Mrs. Earl Stout as VP, Mrs. Chadwick Hendrickson as Secretary, and Mrs. Paul Albrecht as Treasurer.

Independent: Independent Ladies Auxiliary was organized in December 1946 with six wives of members of Independent present. The first regular meeting was held at the home of Mrs. Calvin Carhart on Mechanic Street. At this time officers were elected. Mrs. C. Gordon Wilson was elected President.

Liberty: The Ladies Auxiliary of Liberty Hose organized in January 1946. Miss Catherine Bray sent meeting cards asking members to join. Mrs. Joseph Roswell was the unit's first President. Serving with her were Mrs. Samuel Scalzo as VP, Mrs. Clade Borchardt as Secretary, and Mrs. Jennie Scillano as Treasurer. In 1946, the Auxiliary entered a float in the annual 4th of July parade. Mrs. Bruno Mazza portrayed Betsy Ross.

Union: The Union Hose Ladies Auxiliary was formed on May 26, 1954. Serving as its first President was Mrs. Joseph Funderburke, also Mrs. Franklin White as VP, Mrs. Edward Gelso as Secretary and Mrs. Joseph Costa as Treasurer.

In early 1999, members of the Ladies Auxiliary in the Executive Council meeting had proposed and elected to join in a single Auxiliary organization. The reorganization, into a single Red Bank Fire Department Ladies Auxiliary, took place in January 2000.

Fire Department Photographer
Scott Longfeld

Scott Longfield is a Life Member of Union Hose Company of the Red Bank Volunteer Fire Department. He serves as a fire department photographer and professionally is a photographer for hire. Land, Sea or Air. Web art, Wall art, Vintage Rock art.

To contact Scott:

LONGFIELD602@Comcast.net  
Land Line-Leave Message-732-741-7670
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Firefighting Companies

Navesink Hook and Ladder
Hook & Ladder

Location
7-9 Mechanic Street
Red Bank, NJ 07701

Navesink Hook and Ladder Company station is located at 7-9 Mechanic Street, in a dual bay, two-story firehouse. Company members own and operate the building and property.

This company has no primary area of coverage and responds to all sections of Red Bank. The primary responsibilities of this company when at the scene of the fire include the search and recovery of victims, ventilation, and the overhaul of structures. 

Previous to the organization of the Navesink Hook and Ladder Company of Red Bank the men of the town had formed a bucket brigade. The first man at a fire with his bucket was in control of the volunteer firefighters. Almost every man in the village had his private bucket which he kept handy in his house. When an alarm sounded, which was usually the ringing of a church bell, these men would run to the fire with their buckets, ready for duty. The village of Red Bank had grown sufficiently in size to demand fire protection and the Navesink Hook and Ladder Company was organized. On June 28, 1872, the committee appointed at the citizens meeting held at the Globe Hotel to organize a Hook, Ladder and Bucket Company for Red Bank met in the store of WT Corlies. The Navesink Hook, Ladder and Bucket company was declared to be the name of the company. On January 5, 1873, the word Bucket was erased from the bylaws so as to read Navesink Hook and Ladder Company. Navesink Hook and Ladder Company was incorporated on March 13, 1873, and on July 2, 1873, the company met in their new room on Mechanic Street.

Charles E Applegate always held the post of honor when the two first fire apparatus were taken to Red Bank fires. They were pulled by ropes by scores of men and were steered by a pole that stuck out behind. Charles Applegate was the official steersman. After some years this equipment was abandoned for a combination hand-drawn and horse apparatus.

This was used until 1911 when the company was supplied with a modern Hook and Ladder truck with extension ladders and rubber tires. In 1919, a motorized Hook and Ladder truck was bought for the Navesink Hook and Ladder Company. On May 30, 1935, the New truck, a 75-foot aerial truck, was accepted from American LaFrance.

On July 6, 1962, we received a new American LaFrance 100 foot aerial truck, designated Truck 91. In January 1964, the company purchased the Doremus building next to the firehouse and put both trucks in service.

On Friday, March 30, 1979, at 04:11 hours there was a disastrous fire that destroyed our main company firehouse at 7 Mechanic St. and Truck 91, 1962 American LaFrance was believed to be a total loss and a repowering overhaul was recommended. So on April 4, 1979 Truck 91A, 1935 American LaFrance aerial became the first due unit. In June 1980 the company held its first meeting back in the firehouse in bay 91A. Truck 91 was refurbished by American LaFrance and returned in November after an absence of over 18 months.

In 1987 a new 100 foot Seagrave aerial was received and designated Ladder 91. The refurbished 1962 American LaFrance became Truck 90. Currently, Truck 91A is taken out of storage for ceremonial occasions only.

In 1997, Navesink Hook and Ladder Company celebrated 125 years of service in Red Bank. Like all other companies, it's active members respond to all general alarms and working fires throughout the Borough. Stationed on the east side of town but being the only Hook and Ladder Co. in the borough, it has no primary area coverage, responding to all sections of Red Bank. The primary responsibilities on the fire scene include search and recovery of victims, ventilation, and overhaul of structures.

In March 2001 an American LaFrance aerial was commissioned as Tower Truck 90. The refurbished 1962 American LaFrance Truck 90 was retired from service. Tower 90 is a 2000 American LaFrance, with a 93-foot mid-mount aerial platform. It is equipped with a 4-inch water-way. It carries 169 feet of ground ladders, and a 15K Watt electrical generator for lights, fans, and tools. The truck also carries numerous pieces of rescue equipment including air-bags, hydraulic jacks, and saws. Tower 90 brings to Red Bank a more effective fire fighting power, while also increasing the safety of our volunteer firefighters. Tower 90 incorporates the latest technological advances for safe and efficient fire fighting. The truck meets all the current requirements established by OSHA and the National Fire Prevention Association (NFPA) standards.

Navesink Hook and Ladder Company station is located at 7-9 Mechanic Street, in a dual bay, two-story firehouse. Company members own and operate the building and property.

Independent Engine

Independent Engine - 93Independent Engine

 

Location

151 Spring Street

Red Bank, NJ 07701

 

Independent Engine Company organized on February 10, 1880, as the second engine company of the department and was incorporated on May 12, 1880. James Welsh was the first foreman and his assistants were Joseph Gardiner and John Norman.

 

The company was supplied with a handbrake engine housed with Hook and Ladder Company on Mechanic Street until 1898 when it was transferred to a building on White Street leased from Mrs. O. E Davis. In 1910, the town put a new firehouse on Mechanic Street for the Independent Engine Company, at their current location. The company gave up its handbrake engine when the town installed its water supply in 1884 and became a hose company.

 

Later the borough supplied the company with a large hand-drawn four-wheel hose carriage. Subsequently, this was converted into a horse-drawn apparatus with a drop harness attachment. A regulation horse-drawn hose carriage was bought later. In 1912, a Robinson Jumbo triple-piston pump engine and combination hose and chemical apparatus were provided to Independent Engine Company. This equipment was equipped with scaling ladders and other small fire fighting tools and accessories. The company also operated an auxiliary motor-driven apparatus to take members to and from fires and to carry additional equipment. The first modern American LaFrance apparatus was purchased, in 1927.

 

In 1952, this American LaFrance truck was replaced with a 1,000 gallon per minute American LaFrance pumper. In 1972, a new American LaFrance, Metropolitan Model 1,250 gallon per minute pumper was obtained to replace the 1952 apparatus.

 

In March 1995 a new 1994 Seagrave was received to replace the 1972 American LaFrance. The old LaFrance was donated to the Middletown Fire Academy where it was used for many years for training purposes. The new Seagrave is a 1500 GPM pumper, 6 man enclosed cab with a 500-gallon booster tank. It has a top mount pump panel and a 40-gallon foam tank.

 

In December 2016 the borough closed the old fire house at 32 Mechanic St. and Independent Engine Company was relocated to the First Aid Building on Spring St, along with Liberty Hose Company.

 

Responsibilities

Independent Company's primary fire protection and life rescue responsibilities include the central and eastern areas of the downtown. This area is bound by the Shrewsbury River at the northern side and spans through the town's south-eastern border with the Borough of Little Silver. The company's western boundary is bound by the central portion of Broad Street and spans eastward to the town's eastern border with the Borough of Fair Haven. This area includes a mix of residential homes and buildings, a significant part of the Rivercenter retail and business district, the Red Bank Middle school, on Harding Road, and Riverview Hospital. A major concern in this area is Riverview Hospital, one of the largest medical facilities in Monmouth County. Like all other companies, Engine 93 responds to all general alarms and working fires throughout the Borough.

Liberty Hose

Liberty HoseLocation
151 Spring Street
Red Bank, NJ 07701

Liberty Hose Company’s primary fire protection and life rescue responsibilities are within the Borough's northern section. From the Company's south border, includes most of Monmouth Street and it spans northward to the banks of the Navesink River. 

The Company covers from Rector Place at its western border spanning eastward to Broad Street and Wharf Avenue. This area contains a large portion of the downtown business district or RiverCenter, including the boat marinas located around Marine Park, a number of highrises, two senior citizen housings, two large hotels (Molly Pitcher Inn and Oyster Point Hotel), and a number of single and multi-family residential homes.

Due to a large number of residents and the multiplicity of floors, the largest concern resides with highrises and hotels in the area, mostly located on Riverside Avenue and Bodman Place. These large structures have been fully equipped with sprinkler systems and other modern fire suppression/safety facilities.

Liberty Hose Company was organized on February 11, 1880. The organization took place at a meeting hall on Mechanic Street. The first officers were Foreman Joseph Swannell, Assistant Foreman James Cooper, Secretary Stephen Allen and Treasurer Eben E Heisley. The first elected Red Bank Fire Chief from Liberty Hose Company was Edward Longstreet. Chief Longstreet occupied this position for two consecutive years, 1905 and 1906.

The company for several years met in the frame structure on Mechanic Street used by the Navesink Hook and Ladder Company. Later the Liberty Hose Company occupied the Davis Building at 20 White Street, jointly with the Independent Engine Company. On March 24, 1910, Liberty Hose Company moved to their current location at 40 White Street.

John M. Barberio, a member of Liberty Hose Company was killed February 20, 1945 in Iwo Jima. He was the only member of the Red Bank Fire Department lost to World War II.

Liberty Hose Company primary fire protection and life rescue responsibilities are within the Borough's northern section. From the Company's south border, includes most of Monmouth Street and it spans northward to the banks of the Navesink River. The Company covers from Rector Place at its western border spaning eastward to Broad Street and Wharf Avenue. This area contains a large portion of the downtown business district or RiverCenter, boat marinas located around Marine Park, a number of highrises including at least two senior citizen housings, two large hotels (Molly Pitcher Inn and Oyster Point Hotel), and a number of single and multi-family residential homes.

Due to a large number of residents and the multiplicity of floors, the largest concern resides with highrises and hotels in the area, mostly located on Riverside Avenue and Bodman Place. On the other hand, these large structures have been fully equipped with sprinkler systems and other modern fire suppression/safety facilities.

Liberty Hose Company with Engine 94 protects the North-West section of the Borough. As all other companies, Liberty Hose Company members respond to all general alarms and working fires throughout Red Bank.

The pumper, Engine 94 (Monmouth County Engine 6477) currently in service supporting Liberty Hose Company firefighters, is a 1985 Seagrave 1,500 GPM pumper. The engine was the first seven-man cab apparatus in Monmouth County, placed in service on October 31, 1985.

Engine 94 carries a 500-gallon booster tank, two front (left and right) preconnect 150-ft each 1-3/4 inch hose, and two rear (left and right) preconnect 250-ft each 2-1/2 inch hose. The engine is further equipped with:

 

  • A pack of 1,000 feet of 5 inch supply hose with 5-inch Humat valve.
  • It also packs 1,000 feet of 3 inch hose, 550 feet of 2-1/2 inch hose and 550 feet of 1-3/4 inch hose.
  • Portable deck gun.
  • One 24 foot extension ladder, a roof ladder, and a Little Giant ladder.
  • A 10-foot pike pole, a 6-foot pike pole, and a closet hook.
  • Seven 4,500 psi Scott Packs and seven reserve Scott air bottles.
  • Four 5-gallon drums of high expansion foam.
     
Union Hose
Union Hose

Location
161 Shrewsbury Avenue
Red Bank, NJ 07701

Union Hose Company has primary fire protection and life rescue responsibilities within the west side of the Borough of Red Bank. This includes the area bound by West Bergen Place at the southern side and spans to the northern border of the town at Hubbard's bridge. 

The company's western boundary is the Navesink river or the town's western border and it spans eastward up to NJ Transit railroad tracks. The area includes a mix of residential homes and apartment complexes, a retail and commercial section along Shrewsbury Avenue, and the Borough's Primary school at the end of River Street. It also includes portions of the Conrail railroad tracks used for transportation of industrial and hazardous materials.

Of primary concern are industrial buildings and specifically Globe Petroleum, a petro-chemical distribution company located between the Conrail and NJ Transit tracks.

Union Hose Company was incorporated on March 18, 1897. However, the company was organized first as West Red Bank Hose Company on July 23, 1890. The first elected Red Bank fire chief from the Union Hose Company was Mr. Lester E McQueen. Mr. McQueen then occupied the position of Chief for two consecutive years, 1907 and 1908. The company is located at 161 Shrewsbury Avenue, in a dual bay, two-story building. The property is owned and operated by Union Hose company members.

Union Hose Company has primary fire protection and life rescue responsibilities within the west side of the Borough of Red Bank. This includes the area bound by West Bergen Place at the southern side and spans to the northern border of the town at Hubbard's bridge. The company's western boundary is the Navesink river or the town's western border and it spans eastward up to NJ Transit railroad tracks. The area includes a mix of residential homes and apartment complexes, a retail and commercial section along Shrewsbury Avenue, and the Borough's Primary school at the end of River Street. It also includes portions of the Conrail railroad tracks used for transportation of industrial and hazardous materials. Of primary concern are industrial buildings and specifically Globe Petroleum, a petro-chemical distribution company located between the Conrail and NJ Transit tracks.

Union Hose Company with Engine 95 and its sister Westside Hose Company with Engine 96 jointly protect the westerly area of the Borough, as bound by the NJ Transit tracks and the Navesink River. Like all other companies, Union Hose Company members respond to all general alarms and working fires throughout the Borough.

The pumper, Engine 95 (Monmouth County Engine 6478) currently in service supporting Union Hose Company firefighters, is a 1982 Mack-CF pumper. This engine, which was commissioned into service in 1982, was manufactured by Mack Trucks, Inc. of Seattle, Wa. It has a capacity of 1,250 GPM and it carries a driver and an officer within its fully enclosed front cab. Four additional firefighters may ride in a semi-open rear cab.

Engine 95 carries the following equipment for effective fire fighting:

  • A left-side preconnected speedlay of 150-foot 1-3/4 inch hose.
  • A right-side preconnected speedlay of 200-foot 1-3/4 inch hose.
  • It packs four hose beds, two 3 inch hose beds with one bed preconnected to the Humat valve, one 1-3/4 inch hose bed, and a 2-1/2 inch hose bed (with 500-foot rear preconnected).
  • Pre-piped deck gun.
  • High expansion foam contained in ten 5-gallon drums.
  • Two extension ladders (24-foot, 14-foot), a roof ladder, a closet/attic ladder, and an A-Frame collapsible ladder.
  • A 10-foot pike pole, a 6-foot pike pole and a closet hook.
  • Three fire extinguishers, a Class A water tank, a CO2 and a dry chemical extinguisher.
  • Eight 4,500 psi Scott Packs and fourteen reserve Scott air bottles.
  • Other tools and appliances such as axes, halligan, exhaust fan, gated valves, and forcible entry devices are stored in the various compartments.

Union Hose - Old Timers Night 2021

Westside Hose
Westside Hose

Location 
261 Leighton Avenue
Red Bank, NJ 07701


Westside Hose Company’s primary fire protection and life rescue responsibilities span portions of the Borough's west side. This area includes the town's southern border at Newman Springs Road stretching northward to West Bergen Place. From the town's western border, at the Navesink river, it spans eastward to the NJ Transit railroad tracks and including portions of Conrail railroad tracks. 

The area contains a power utility plant and a mix of residential, recreational, commercial, and industrial facilities. A convalescent home located in a multi-story building on Chapin Avenue is of major concern.

Westside Hose Company incorporated in October 1909, is the youngest volunteer fire company of the RBFD. The company was originally formed as a firefighting unit of Shrewsbury Township. Thereafter, when the town's boundaries changed, the company became part of the Red Bank. The first elected Red Bank fire chief out of Westside Hose was Mr. Fred Dressler, in 1929.

The company is located at 261 Leighton Avenue, in a two-story building containing a single-engine bay, a general gathering room with a kitchen on the first floor, and an assembly room on the second floor. The property is owned and operated by company members.

Westside Hose primary fire protection and life rescue responsibilities span portions of the Borough's west side. This area includes the town's southern border at Newman Springs Road stretching northward to West Bergen Place. From the town's western border, at the Navesink river, it spans eastward to the NJ Transit railroad tracks and including portions of Conrail railroad tracks. The area contains a power utility plant and a mix of residential, recreational, commercial, and industrial facilities. A convalescent home located in a multi-story building on Chapin Avenue is of major concern.

Westside Hose Company with Engine 96 and its sister Union Hose Company with Engine 95 jointly cover the western area of the Borough, which is bound by NJ Transit tracks and the Navesink River. As all other companies, Westside Hose Company members respond to all general alarms and working fires throughout the Borough.

The pumper, Engine 96 currently supporting Westside Hose Company firefighters, is a 1989 Pierce Arrow pumper manufactured by Pierce Manufacturing, Inc. This engine, which was commissioned into service in 1990, is designed to carry a driver, an officer and four additional firefighters within its fully enclosed cab.

Engine 96 contains a 500-gallon water tank and a 60 gallon high expansion foam tank for quick response and to be the first line of attack at fire scenes. Equipped with a Waterous midship (Model CMU) pump, this engine has a capacity of 1,500 GPM at 150 PSIG discharge (maximum discharge: 600 PSIG). The engine is further equipped with:

  • Two speedlays with 200 feet of pre-connected 1-3/4 inch hose, each.
  • It packs four hose beds, a 3 inch hose (Humat valve pre-connected), 1-3/4 inch hose, a 2-1/2 inch hose, and a 5 inch hose bed, respectively.
  • Pre-piped deck gun.
  • One extension ladder, a roof ladder, a closet ladder and an A-Frame collapsible ladder.
  • A 10-foot pike pole, a 6-foot pike pole and a closet hook.
  • Three fire extinguishers, a Class A water tank, a CO2 and a dry chemical extinguisher.
  • Nine 4,500 psi Scott Packs and twelve reserve Scott air bottles.
  • Other tools and appliances such as axes, halligan, exhaust fan, gated valves, and forcible entry devices are stored in the various compartments.Westside Hose

     

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RBFD Memorial

The Red Bank Fire Department Fallen Firefighters Memorial, is dedicated on December 27, 1998. On August 3, 1997 the Memorial Site at Marine Park.

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